“Lost In History”: 30 Pictures That Throw Light On Our Past https://ift.tt/4WPB7S6

marzo 16, 2022

We usually forget to remember what we’ve heard, but we memorize the things we saw. A study showed that human memory remembers images better than words. We recall the points in our life that made us feel a certain way. We might not remember when a dog walked by, but we will definitely remember when we got bit.

An Instagram account named “Lost In History” shares powerful yet never seen or forgotten images from the 20th century. Although we will never experience those moments in real life, these images help us imagine what life was like before we were born. Sit back, relax and take a look at these incredible historical images.

Check out other Demilked articles here and here to see more historical images.

More info: Instagram

#1 Nurses Showing A Set Of Newly Born Triplets To A Surprised Father In A New York City Hospital, 1946. Photo By Keystone-France

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#2 Keanu Reeves Photographed By Willy Rizzo, In Paris, 2003

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#3 Frida Kahlo Painting In Bed, 1950s

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#4 The Famous Photo Of Lady Diana Falling Asleep During An Official Royal Engagement, 1981. She Was Actually Pregnant With Prince William At The Time, However Her Pregnancy Had Yet To Be Announced

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#5 She’s In Someone’s Locket, 1940s

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#6 Ben Affleck And Matt Damon Calling Their Moms After Winning The Oscar For Good Will Hunting, 1997

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#7 In 1922, Scientists Entered A Ward Of Dying Children, All In Comatose Diabetic Ketoacidosis, And Injected A New Drug (Insulin) Into Them As Families Were Already Beginning To Grieve

Image source: lostinhistorypics

Before they had injected the last person on the ward, the first woke up. One by one, all of the children awoke from their diabetic comas. A room of death and gloom, became a place of joy and hope.

#8 Dad Showing Off His Skill To The Surprise Of His Little Daughter In Melbourne, Australia, 1940s

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#9 Princess Fatemeh Khanum Was The Princess Of Persia. She Was The Daughter Of King Nasir Al-Din Shah Qajar, Who Ruled Persia From 1848 To 1896. She Was Considered The Ultimate Symbol Of Beauty In Persia During The Early 1900s

Image source: lostinhistorypics

She had over 150 suitors, and it is said that 13 of them committed s**cide due to unrequited love for the princess.

#10 Refusing To Do The Nazi Salute, 1936

Image source: lostinhistorypics

The man was later identified to be August Landmesser who joined the Nazi party in 1931, believing that doing so would help him land a job during a poor economy. However, in 1934, as fate would have it, Landmesser fell in love with a Jewish women named Irma Eckler.

A year later they became engaged but their marriage application was denied by newly enacted Nuremberg laws which prohibited marriages between Jews and non-Jews. This however, did not deter them from having children, and Eckler gave birth to their first daughter, Ingrid, in 1935.

Two years later, Landmesser and his wife and daughter attempted to flee Germany to Denmark but were apprehended by authorities. Landmesser was charged with “dishonoring the race” but was later acquitted due to lack of evidence and was just ordered to end his relationship with Eckler.

However, he refused to abandon his wife and was eventually arrested again in 1938. This time he was sentenced to hard labor for 3-years at a nearby concentration camp. It was the last time he would see his wife and daughter.

Eckler was sent to prison where she gave birth to their second daughter, Irene. From there, she was sent to a concentration camp where she was eventually murdered in 1942.

Landmesser was released from his duties in 1941 and was eventually drafted to fight against the Allies. He was sent on the most dangerous missions due to his “criminal past”. He was eventually killed in action in Croatia in 1944.

The two daughters were placed with foster parents and survived the war.

#11 Spanish Flu, 1918. Family Portrait

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#12 Sometimes Little Help Is All You Need, 1945

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#13 An Upset Little Patient After A Visit To The Dentist, 1920s

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#14 Safety Regulations In The 1960s

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#15 17 Year-Old Juliane Koepcke Was Sucked Out Of An Airplane In 1971 After It Was Struck By A Bolt Of Lightning. She Fell 2 Miles To The Ground, Strapped To Her Seat And Survived After She Endured 10 Days In The Amazon Jungle

Image source: lostinhistorypics

After ten days, she found a boat moored near a shelter, and found the boat’s fuel tank still partly full. Koepcke poured the gasoline on her wounds, an action which succeeded in removing the maggots from her arm. Out of 93 passengers and crew, Juliane was the only survivor of the Lansa flight 508 crash that took place December 24th, 1971.

#16 David Bowie Performs To A Huge Crowd In 1983

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#17 A Young Barack Obama With His Mother On Halloween (1964)

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#18 In The Mid-1950’s, Italian Shoemakers Were Selling “Defense Shoes”, Complete With Spurs On Toes And Heels To Kick Away Offensive Sex Pests, Especially In Rome

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#19 Startled Bystander At The Annual Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade, 1994

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#20 Marriage Advice For Young Ladies From A Suffragette, 1918. The Pamphlet Is On Display At The Pontypridd Museum In Wales. The Suffragette Is Unknown

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#21 “I Think The Saddest People Always Try Their Hardest To Make People Happy Because They Know What It’s Like To Feel Absolutely Worthless And They Don’t Want Anyone Else To Feel Like That.” Robin Williams

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#22 The Last Photo Taken Of Hachikō, A Japanese Akita Dog Remembered For His Unwavering Loyalty To His Owner

Image source: lostinhistorypics

Hachikō belonged to professor Eizaburo Ueno who lived in Shibuya and taught at Tokyo Imperial University during the early 1920s. Every day, Ueno would walk to Shibuya station with Hachikō and take the train to work. Once he was done for the day, he would take the train back and return to the station at precisely 3 pm. Hachikō would always be there waiting patiently to accompany the professor home. One day, Ueno suffered a stroke and never arrived at the station. Hachikō went to the station every day for 9 years until his death in 1935. A statue of Hachikō is installed outside Tokyo’s Shibuya station, in Japan. In 2015, another Hachiko statue got erected at Tokyo university to celebrate the faithful dog’s 80th death anniversary. They reunited Hachiko with his master, professor Ueno.

#23 Rowan Atkinson With His 1981 Aston Martin Vantage

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#24 Princess Diana Dancing With John Travolta At A White House Dinner, 1985

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#25 A Member Of The Harlem Hellfighters (369th Infantry Regiment) Poses For The Camera While Holding A Puppy He Saved During World War 1, 1918

Image source: lostinhistorypics

The Harlem Hellfighters was a regiment made up of decorated Black soldiers who fought as part of the French army because the U.S. did not allow Black soldiers to fight alongside white soldiers. The French accepted the Harlem Hellfighters with open arms and did not racially segregate them.

During World War 1, they fought on the front lines for 191 days, longer than any other American unit. And as a result, suffered the most casualties of any American regiment—losing approximately 1,500 men. Despite the heavy death toll and the poor replacement system, the Harlem Hellfighters never lost a trench or a foot of ground to the enemy; none of them became prisoners of war. Not only were they one of the most successful regiments of World War 1, but they also helped bring Jazz to France.

Upon returning home, the Harlem Hellfighters received a welcome parade in New York City; a privilege that was denied to them before they had left for war. However, the celebrations were short-lived as the summer of 1919 became known as the Red Summer, in which the country saw some of the worst racial violence since the Civil War.

The Harlem Hellfighters who dreamed of returning home to a place that would finally treat them with respect and as equal human beings, quickly realized that nothing had changed at all.

#26 She Was 11 When WWI Started, 36 When WWII Started, 74 When Star Wars Released And 116 When Covid-19 Started. And Her Name Is Kane Tanaka As The World’s Oldest Living Person At Age 118 Years

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#27 Little Boy About To Receive A Dog For His Birthday (1955)

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#28 Can We Just Acknowledge The Fact That These Two Were Married For 74 Years? I Can’t Imagine Being Coupled With Someone For That Amount Of Time And Then Losing Them. She Must Be Absolutely Devastated

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#29 A Mother And Her Son On Their Way To A Pride Walk, 1985

Image source: lostinhistorypics

#30 US Soldier Shakes Hand With A Dog In Luxembourg During The Battle Of Bulge, 1944

Image source: lostinhistorypics

The post “Lost In History”: 30 Pictures That Throw Light On Our Past appeared first on DeMilked.



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